Alexander Technique and Academic Tutoring

Kai Kleinbard is a learning and movement specialist dedicated to helping young learners succeed in school. Kai offers one-on-one and group lessons in Academic Support, Alexander Technique and in helping youth develop their creative interests.

http://www.amsatonline.org/teacher/KaiKleinbard
Services: thebodyliterate.com
Research Initiative: bodyliterate.org
kaiming718@yahoo.com
(917)693-9960

What is the most effective way to practice?

What is the most effective way to practice?

What is the most effective way to practice?

A recent NY Times article described research about practice vs. talent.   Recent research demonstrates the importance of inborn talent and skill level (rather than practice) as well as how one practices not just practice hours.

While talent appears to play an important role in skill building, how one practices is integral to obtaining skill; in other…

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What are some aspects of the Reggio Emilia Approach that are supported within the bodyLITERATE’s education philosophies?

What are some aspects of the Reggio Emilia Approach that are supported within the bodyLITERATE’s education philosophies?

What are some aspects of the Reggio Emilia Approach that are supported within the bodyLITERATE’s education philosophies?

A collection of wonderful education ideas…  A snapshot of ideas I instantly connect with while reading this summary of the Reggio Emilia approach to education: http://childdiscoverycenter.org/non-traditional-classroom/what-is-the-reggio-emilia-approach/

learning environment as…

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What is one of the teacher’s main functions?

What is one of the teacher’s main functions?

What is one of the teacher’s main functions?

“the teacher’s function should be to rehabilitate the imagination in areas of fixation.”
From: “How Life Moves : Explorations in Meaning and Body Awareness” by Caryn McHose and Kevin Frank

I appreciated this quotation, because I have found, as a teacher, I would rather help young learners open their sense of freedom, choice and potential to the…

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Helping Students Motivate Themselves

We know that it is often easier to get students to do what we want them to do by dangling a carrot — or threatening a negative consequence. The problem with this kind of strategy is that, as Daniel Pink discusses in his TED talk, the research shows it generally works for just the short-term, and it appears to work only in generating simple actions, not in inspiring the kind of higher-order thinking skills and abilities we want our students to develop.

the secret of effective motivation

Motivating students to succeed in school and complete the necessary academic work to achieve success is a major element of effective teaching…

Encourage people to do something for its own sake, not for its benefits.

THERE are two kinds of motives for engaging in any activity: internal and instrumental. If a scientist conducts research because she wants to discover important facts about the world, that’s an internal motive, since discovering facts is inherently related to the activity of research. If she conducts research because she wants to achieve scholarly renown, that’s an instrumental motive, since the relation between fame and research is not so inherent. Often, people have both internal and instrumental motives for doing what they do.

What mix of motives — internal or instrumental or both — is most conducive to success? You might suppose that a scientist motivated by a desire to discover facts and by a desire to achieve renown will do better work than a scientist motivated by just one of those desires. Surely two motives are better than one. But as we and our colleagues argue in a paper newly published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, instrumental motives are not always an asset and can actually be counterproductive to success.